Recipes

My healthy take on this Tex-Mex favourite, this burrito won’t leave you feeling weighed down. Traditionally loaded with refried beans, rice, cheese and sour cream, for some they can be difficult to digest leaving you feeling sluggish. Next time you’re craving Mexican, make this your go-to for an option your tastebuds and tummy will love.



Buying a whole fish is often more economical than buying the fillet. It also makes it a cinch to prep! Ask your fishmonger or supermarket counter to clean and scale a snapper for you, then throw it on a baking tray, add some simple flavours and you’ve got one tasty, nourishing meal in under 30 minutes.



Doesn’t sound very sexy, but adding all your leftover veggies and meat or seafood to the bottom of a shallow dish and adding eggs on top makes for one the simplest, tastiest meals around. At the end of the week I often have some greens that are past their best – and they work great in this dish. Gather all your odd-and-ends – reduce waste and get dinner in under 30 minutes. Winning!



Just when you thought smoothie-bowls were so 2016, you get hit with this bowl-o-rama that tastes like cupcakes. Not just any cupcake, RED VELVET ones. Uh huh. It’s packed with protein for muscle recovery, along with beet powder that is said to increase endurance. The cacao (aside from being insanely delicious) is a super source of anti-oxidants and also helps you body to produce happy chemicals. What’s not to love?!



‘Tis the season for blueberries here in Aus. They’re in abundance and cheap until March, so I try to get my fill in the summer months when they’re at their tastiest and locally sourced. Aside from being once of the most nutrient dense fruits around, they make the most amazing ice-cream that can legit double up as a brekkie bowl when your post-Christmas sugar crash is looming. The natural sweetness they provide kills sugar cravings and their fibre keeps you fuller for longer too!



I made these to end my jealousy with green pancakes popping up on my instagram feed every damn minute. There’s a simple reason they’re so popular – they taste amazing. They’re so quick to make too – there’s no excuse for a bowl of processed, sugary cereal. Matcha comes with some awesome health benefits too, including a metabolism boost and super amounts of antioxidants. Time to get flippin’.



I’ve tried a fair few pizzas in my time. I wouldn’t go so far as to call myself a connoisseur, but I know a good slice when I taste one. I’ve played around with some low-carb cauliflower bases but they just don’t fill me up, so I turned to beans for something more substantial. This Pizza is pretty phenomenal actually, both on nutrition profile and more importantly, taste. It’s cheesy, herby and chewy – the perfect start to the weekend, minus the hefty bill from Dominos.

The healthy stuff: A one-cup serving of black beans contains nearly 15 grams of fibre (50% of the RDA) and 15g of protein (equivalent to 60g chicken). This outstanding protein-fibre combination doesn’t exist in other fruit, vegetables, grains, meats, dairy products, nuts and seeds, or seafood. The antioxidants found in the skins of the beans promote better eyesight, cardiac health, capillary strength, skin appearance, and an improved immune system. They’re also great for energy, maintaining blood sugar levels, and digestion!



Mason jar salads are just that – a salad in a mason (or glass) jar. I’m not sure who came up with this concept, but I think it’s genius. Storing the salad in a jar keeps it fresh for 5-7 days. What’s easier than jamming loads of fresh ingredients into a jar? It will save your loads of cash if you usually buy from the local cafe, not to mention the calories you’ll save! Theres a strategy to assembly to keep all the contents at their freshest:

Layer 1 – Dressing: 1-2 tablespoons
Layer 2 – Hard vegetables: carrot, celery, capsicum, red onion, cucumber
Layer 3 – Complex carbs: Brown rice, pumpkin or quinoa (if desired)
Layer 4 – Soft vegetables: avocado, tomato
Layer 5 – Protein: chicken, tofu, egg and cheese
Layer 6 – Salad greens: lettuce or baby spinach

Now admittedly the one I’ve made here, I ate straight away, so I totally ignored this method. If you’re going to eat it soon, or dressing with citrus (lemon / lime) and just leave a wedge in the top, you don’t need to worry too much about the layering method. If you’re storing it for a while, ensure the dressing is kept at the bottom, and then mix through the salad just before lunch time.

Let’s get to it!



I know y’all like ‘but porridge is sweet’, and you’d be right…until now. Oats can be enjoyed just like quinoa, rice or buckwheat in many recipes. Just because your mum used to cover them in honey, doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy them in a savoury dish too. To confuse you more, this is a breakfasty dish – but also great at lunch or as a side for dinner. Oats are a great source of soluble fibre that will keep you regular and lower cholesterol. The beta-glucan fiber found in oats helps regulate your appetite for up to 4 hours too, so you’re less likely to be snacking.

Once you make this, you’ll wonder why you haven’t been having it for years. Expect to start seeing it on restaurant menus soon! *2016 prediction*



My mother-in-law has a knack for risotto. You might say it’s her signature dish (though, she has a million of those). She spends hours stirring it until it’s a delicious creamy consistency and tops with a mix of roasted balsamic vine tomatoes, garlic and mint – it’s an incredible combination. For me, it’s missing a protein element for muscle repair and satiety, and is pretty heavy on refined carbs. It’s more of an ‘occasion’ food – which I hate, so here’s my take on low-carb risotto, using cauliflower rice instead of arborio. No white wine (though you could add it if you wanted!) and served up with some hearty organic chicken breast. Now that’s one balanced, every-day kinda risotto I can get on board with.

The humble cauliflower provides a high amount of nutrients for a small amount of calories. Cauliflower is also high in both fibre and water content, which helps to prevent constipation, maintain a healthy digestive tract and lower the risk of colon cancer. A ‘regular’ risotto indeed.