Sides, Dressings & Dips

Oven-Roasted Lemon Brussels Sprouts

Brussels sprouts aren’t amongst the most well-loved of veggies, but definitely worth a place in your fridge. Not only are they are a good source of protein, iron and potassium (which offer a range of health benefits), but are also high in fibre, keeping you fuller for longer. The lemon in this recipe takes them up a notch from your usual sprouts – adding zing to their earthy flavour.

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Sweet Potato Super Fries with Avocado Cream

Swap your usual fries for the super sweet potato version. A source of vitamin C, vitamin D and iron, sweet potatoes are also a good source of magnesium which is the relaxation and anti-stress mineral.

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Coconut Maple Bacon

This insanely delicious combo of salty and sweet makes for a perfect snack of salad topping any day of the week.
Skip the processed deli pork and try this for a nutritious, simple and delicious snack – what more could you ask for?

I see some happy little vegetarians.

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Moroccan Quinoa

Quinoa (pronounced keen-wah) is member of the seed family. I mispronounced this for several years before being corrected and turning to Google for definitive advice. Regardless of what you call it, its wonderfully healthy and versatile. Not only is it a complete protein – making it fantastic for vegetarians – but this superfood is also rich in iron, magnesium and dietary fiber. Tasty and just a little bit sweet, this recipe will leave you with enough for a quick and delicious cold lunch during the working week.

Griddled Eggplant with Yoghurt and Mint

Eggplant is an excellent source of bone-building manganese, and cooked without oil this delicious purple vegetable yields only 12 calories per cup! That means you can fill up without filling out while getting a healthy dose of vitamins and minerals.

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Apricot and Pistacho Quinoa

Quinoa is a great source of protein, iron and fibre – awesome news for vegetarians. Slightly nutty in flavour, this super seed is a fantastic low GI carb that will keep you full for hours. This dish has a nice sweet twist with the addition of some chopped dried apricots, but fresh apple, pear or orange segments would work just as well.

Sticky Chantenay Carrots

The nutrition in carrots are held in protein sacs that have to be broken by heat (cooking) or mechanical action (grinding, juicing, proper chewing).Also, by cooking carrots in oil you can increase the availability of carotenoids by 600 percent.This recipe calls for roasting in hazelnut oil, so you will get a maximum kick of nutrients and good fats. Serve alongside your favourite lean meat dishes.

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